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An interesting month in North Dakota when it comes to airline boardings. Five airports, Dickinson, Williston and Fargo, reported increases. So did Minot and Grand Forks, although just barely.

Dickinson’s although relatively small compared to the biggest five is getting there, and the increase as a percentage was huge, nearly 200 percent. Now what could that be? Oh, yes, oil. It is a good thing that the oil boom is over or there would have been several airplane collisions at the Dickinson airport. Again, the oil industry has entered a new maturing phase. First, they are only drilling holes which have nearly a 100 percent success rate, as fast as the fracking crews and the final set up crews can get to them. To have several hundred non producing wells sitting there waiting for completion makes no sense.

The Dickinson boarding data needs to be read with the North Dakota Department of Mineral Resource report, which is posted on this site when that department releases their data. See the date on that post. That is usually the time of month you can expect the report.

Williston, although only increasing just over 25 percent is also attributable to the oil business, and 25 percent is enough of an increase to make even JFK exuberant. Less than 10 years ago both airports (Dickinson and Williston) had about the same traffic. Williston of course is the more (the state’s most) important oil city. Minot’s slight increase probably can also be attributable to oil.

Grand Forks slight increase is what you would hope for in the part of the state that is slowing down. In fact, my bet if you did a real study the increase came about because of the university especially the Colleges of Engineering and Aero Space, and the unmanned aerial vehicle personnel located both at UND and at the air base.

The interesting data, the one I would look at in more depth if I was serious about knowing my competition is Fargo. The increase is nearly 14 percent. There is nothing here like oil, or government, or any thing that I am aware of other than just a continuing reflection of how fast Fargo is growing. How come? How come it is growing, and especially why is it growing at the speed it is continually, not in fit and starts?

As I have said before, Fargo and Sioux Falls are the Twin Cities furthest out and “newest” suburbs. It is a chicken and egg situation, but they have airplanes coming in from more places and that makes them grow, but they grow because those air planes come from more places.
While they are still small towns by America’s standards they are true urban areas and are regarded as places for corporations to consider for establishing at least part of their businesses. This is the first time that has happened in either state.